Well Being

We Weren’t Lying: Fruits and Vegetables Really Are Good for You

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photo: Thinkstock

Why do countless studies prove the benefits of eating a diet full of fruits and vegetables, yet under one-third of Americans eat two servings of fruits daily? A study from The Archives of Internal Medicine found that adults who had higher levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, and lycopene in their blood were less likely to die over a 14-year period than people with low levels of these antioxidants that are found in fruits and vegetables. To us (and we'd hope to a lot of you) this is a no-brainer.

The constant barrage of processed food ads we experience everyday and studies like “The Twinkie Diet,” make people think that they can be healthy without eating produce. Of course, individuals will adopt healthier diets after suffering a heart attack or being faced with high blood pressure. But we wonder if there is an en masse wake-up call that could open the entire population's eyes to nutrition, stopping health problems before they start. What do you think it will take for people to finally understand that eating fruits and vegetables makes them healthier?

via TIME Healthland

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