Well Being

Victoria Beckham Believes That Her Body Represents “The General Public”–She Is Wrong

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victoria beckham

Victoria Beckham used to be a Spice Girl. She is married to one of the most recognizable footballers on the planet. Between the two of them, they have four children and are estimated to be worth more than $166 million. In May, she will grace the cover of Harper's Bazaar for the second time. She wears a U.S. size 4, reportedly. And yet, in the Harper's interview, she admits to tries on many of the new clothes for her forthcoming fashion line because, she says, “I stand for the general public here.” Really, Becks? Really?

In the interview, Beckham notes that, while she was pregnant, it was difficult for her to help design the clothing for eponymous line (which is predicted to make tens of millions of dollars)–because she really liked to elbow models out of the way and try on the clothes herself, because, ostensibly, she has a more “realistic” body. Sure, Victoria. Sure you do.

The 37-year-old is constantly lauded for looking amazing (read: thin), and has been open about her own experience with eating disorders and poor self-esteem. She's also been a favorite in the thinspo community. And, to her credit, Beckham also admits in the interview that her “tummy isn't as tight as it used to be, but I've got four amazing kids, and that's what really matters.” Which is a more positive angle than she's taken in previous years. In 2006, the ultra-slender woman told the Australian editor of Harper's that she had “so much saggy skin on my stomach,” and that “I might fit into jeans, but trust me, I look really awful naked.”

But a small shift toward accepting her body (which, she admits, is aging, and she's “not trying to fight it”) doesn't exactly make her experience, her life, and her body any more “average” than that of “the general public,” when, recall, two out of three American women is overweight or obese.

It's nice to see Beckham coming around toward slightly more body-positive rhetoric, but if her clothing is made to fit women built like her, it's definitely not made for the “general public.”

Image: Harper's Bazaar via New York Daily News

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