Well Being

Under Armour Thinks You Adorable Ladies Need To Choose ‘Your Color’ For Sports Gear (But Men Don’t)

By  | 
underarmour-website

Click to expand.

On Monday, while creating my “bright running shoes” shopping guide, I was looking through all the sites I would normally look at for sports gear and found a rather striking difference between the appearances of Under Armour‘s women's frontpage and the men's. Above is the initial page prior to choosing men's or women's clothing.

underarmour-mens-website

The men's site includes the same photo of the guy running, celebrating the act and runner.

underarmour-womens-website

The women's site doesn't celebrate running or female runners so much as it shows off all the colors and fashion styles you can get your oh-so-adorbz clothing in. Because that's all that female runners care about: how cute we look in our clothes and whether they go with our skin's undertones! “Hey Becky, do I have a winter complexion or am I more of a runner who should be respected as such?” Let's go with the latter, please.

While I obviously did a guide on bright, colorful running shoes, that was because I personally love those types of looks, and it has nothing to do with my gender. Men love neon shoes, as well, but we're a women's site, so the ones I posted were for women. However, if you're going to be a retailer of both men and women's shoes, you shouldn't just patronizingly put performance over appearance for the men and the opposite for women in their advertising.

Additionally, their side-by-side men's/women's site blend (shown at the top of this post) still shows a bit of gendering, as the woman is wearing primarily pink and the guy is in blue, i.e. the “traditional” colors signifying femininity and masculinity.