Well Being

Live In NYC (Or Any City)? You Should See This Video On Gas Emissions

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If you are presently living in a city, particularly one as bustling as New York, you likely realize that there is a considerable amount of emissions going into the world. Many people believe that NYC is “good on gas,” as most residents do not opt to drive to work and instead take public transportation or bike, but Mayor Bloomberg and his team at the Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability would like you to realize otherwise.

They created a video about the quantity of CO2 emissions that are released into the atmosphere each year that not only tells the facts, it shows them. They explain that, if you were to put a ton of CO2 under pressure, it would be 33 feet across. Then, they ask  “if we took all the CO2 coming from vehicles, buildings, power plants across the city and gathered them in a clump, at one spot right next the Empire State Building, how much CO2 is emitted in a single hour?” The answer is that the “pile” could reach about halfway up the iconic skyscraper.

They then wonder what an entire day would look like, which resulted in the image atop this article. And a year? Well, it's considerably more than you might imagine. But don't take our word for it, check out the video:

So, yes–while NYC and many other cities have made strides in the areas of environmental lifestyle changes, we have a long way to go. It's not good for any of us to get too comfortable in thinking we've done enough; there's always more we can do to improve our environmental impact and reduce the amount of emissions we directly or indirectly contribute to. In fact, the suburbs are even more detrimental to the air, as the average in the United States for emissions per capita is three times that of New York City.

“Combating climate change is one of the great challenges of our age,” Mayor Bloomberg states in his forward. Moral of the story? We need to be vigilant and productive to keep our world progressing for the better, and it's entirely possible.

[NPR]