Well Being

Fix-A-Flat Booty: Woman Has Cement, Tire Sealant Injected Into Buttocks

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This morning, another example of the insane lengths some women will go to in the quest for a better body: A woman in Florida had “Fix-a-Flat” tire sealant, cement and mineral oil injected into her buttocks, in an attempt to get that coveted Kim Kardashian booty on the cheap.

The 30-year-old Florida woman, whose name is being withheld, was severely injured, after fake plastic surgeon Oneal Ron Morris injected her with the fix-a-flat and cement concoction, then sealed things up with Super Glue, in May 2010. The toxic materials spread through her body and nearly killed her, the Miami Herald reports. The woman went to three different hospitals about her “pneumonia-like symptoms” and the “large, infected welts on her backside” before admitting to doctors what she'd had done. [tagbox tag=”plastic surgery”]

The buttocks are “one of the worst places for injections,” California plastic surgeon John Di Saia told the O.C. Register.

“Booty injections not infrequently go badly. Qualified doctors tend to not offer them, so people can find themselves in not-so-qualified hands. Buttock enhancement … is less predictable than many other operations.”

“Dr.” Morris, a transgendered woman (pictured above) with a shocking amount of junk in her own trunk, was arrested by police on Friday, and charged with practicing medicine without a license and causing bodily harm.

It's easy to assume this is an isolated incident—one particularly gullible woman, at the hands of one particularly unscrupulous faux doctor—but Morris is suspected to be part of “an underground network of scam artists” that's been offering home buttocks augmentations at ‘pumping parties' across South Florida, the Miami Herald says. Unlicensed injectors of various appearance-enhancing gels, silicones and other substances have been responsible for a number women's deaths in the past several years (and then there was the woman who recently died after injecting hot beef fat into her own face). There's even a name—”silicone embolism syndrome”—for the problems that arise when non-medical silicone (of the variety sold at hardware stores) used in injections and implants travels to the lungs or brain and causes clots.

Dr. Malcolm Z. Roth, president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, told HealthDay that pumping parties and illicit injections have been on the rise. Sometimes women are aware of the illicit nature of the procedures, sometimes they're not. Regardless, it's all just kind of grotesquely sad, isn't it? Women are literally dying to get a better backside, or more plumped-up lips. These are extreme cases, sure, but it just shows the extreme influence the fetishization of certain body parts and beauty ideals can exert.